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Table 1. Selected chemicals associated with contact/occupational vitiligo

Most potent phenol/catechol derivatives
Monobenzyl ether of hydroquinone
Hydroquinone (1,4-dihydroxybenzene; 1,4-benzendediol; quinol;
p-hydroxyphenol)
p-tert-Butylchatechol
p-tert-Butylphenol
p-tert-Amylphenol

Additional phenol/catechol derivatives
Monomethyl ether of hydroquinone (p-methoxyphenol);
p-hydroxyanisole)
Monoethyl ether of hydroquinone (p-ethoxyphenol)
p-Phenylphenol
p-Octylphenol
p-Nonylphenol
p-Isopropylcatechol
p-Methylcatechol
Butylated hydroxytoluene
Butylated hydroxyanisole
Pyrocatechol (1,2-benxenediol)
p-Cresol


Sulfhydryls
B-Mercaptoethylamine hydrochlorie (cysteamine)
N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-dimethylamine hydrochloride
Sulfanolic acid
Cystamine dihydrochloride
3-Mercaptopropylamine hydrochloride

Miscellaneous
Mercurials
Arsenic
Cinnamic aldehyde
p-Pheylenediamine
Benzyl alcohol
Azaleic acid
Corticosteroids
Optic preparations
Eserine (physostigmine)
Diisopropyl fluorophoshate
Tio-tepa (N, N', N"-triethylene-thiophosphoramide)
Guanonitrofuracin
Systemic medications
Chloroquine
Fluphenazine (prolixin)


Source: Boissy R, Manga P. On the etiology of contact/occupational vitiligo. Pigment Cell Research. 2004. 17: 208-214.
 
   
 
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